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Please be advised that future verbal and written communications from the bank may be in English only. These communications may include, but are not limited to, account agreements, statements and disclosures, changes in terms or fees; or any servicing of your account.

Por favor, tenga en cuenta que es posible que las comunicaciones futuras del banco, ya sean verbales o escritas, sean únicamente en inglés. Estas comunicaciones podrían incluir, entre otras, contratos de cuentas, estados de cuenta y divulgaciones, así como cambios en términos o cargos o cualquier tipo de servicio para su cuenta.

Informamos que as futuras comunicações do banco, verbais e escritas, podem estar disponíveis apenas em inglês. Essas comunicações podem incluir, entre outras, acordos de conta, extratos de conta e divulgações, alterações aos termos ou tarifas, ou qualquer tipo de serviço pertinente à sua conta.

仅此通知,本行即日起发出的口头及书面通信可能将只提供英文版本。这些通信可能包括但不限于账户协议,账单和通知,条款或费用变更;或任何为您账户提供的服务。

Please be advised that future verbal and written communications from the bank may be in English only. These communications may include, but are not limited to, account agreements, statements and disclosures, changes in terms or fees; or any servicing of your account.

Por favor, tenga en cuenta que es posible que las comunicaciones futuras del banco, ya sean verbales o escritas, sean únicamente en inglés. Estas comunicaciones podrían incluir, entre otras, contratos de cuentas, estados de cuenta y divulgaciones, así como cambios en términos o cargos o cualquier tipo de servicio para su cuenta.

Informamos que as futuras comunicações do banco, verbais e escritas, podem estar disponíveis apenas em inglês. Essas comunicações podem incluir, entre outras, acordos de conta, extratos de conta e divulgações, alterações aos termos ou tarifas, ou qualquer tipo de serviço pertinente à sua conta.

仅此通知,本行即日起发出的口头及书面通信可能将只提供英文版本。这些通信可能包括但不限于账户协议,账单和通知,条款或费用变更;或任何为您账户提供的服务。

The-Thing-with-Feathers-Art-and-hope-in-challenging-times

Perspectives

“The Thing with Feathers”: Art and hope in challenging times

Mary-Kate O'Hare

By Mary-Kate O'Hare

Art Advisor, Art Advisory & Finance

May 7, 2020Posted InWealth Advisory

In 1861, Emily Dickinson opened one of her beloved poems by celebrating the human capacity for hope, imagining it as a little bird -the thing with feathers." Written at the onset of the American Civil War, one of the most traumatic episodes in US history, the poem posits that hope resides inside the spirit of every person. Its song is steadfast and resilient, even, as Dickinson wrote, in the “Gale….and on the strangest Sea.”

It feels as if we are surfing the “strangest Sea” right now. The COVID-19 pandemic has locked down the world and separated us from each other. Our routines and rituals have been dramatically interrupted. We face personal and global uncertainty regarding the economy, politics, and healthcare. Is it possible that Dickinson’s “thing with feathers” can endure? 

The-Thing-with-Feathers-Art-and-hope-in-challenging-times

Martin Creed, Work No. 851: Everything Is Going To Be Alright, 2008 installed at Rennie Museum, Vancouver.

Photo: Blaine Campbell. Courtesy Rennie Collection.

Artists show us that the answer is a resounding “yes.” When faced with great social and personal challenges artists throughout history have looked inside themselves, heard hope’s song, and asked how they can put their creativity to work. They have turned experiences of privation, isolation, fear, pain, and exile into powerful demonstrations of vision and critique, optimism and anguish, beauty and joy. Some draw upon long held artistic traditions while others develop new visual languages to find the appropriate means of expression. In whatever form, artists voice our range of experiences and help guide us through choppy waters. They show us that hope and human creativity survive and even flourish in difficult times.  

But in these times of social distancing how can we directly access art’s potential for uplift and reflection? Some artists are finding ways to connect with us right inside of our homes. Damien Hirst, for example, has offered a particularly hopeful example. Inspired by pictures of rainbows people have placed in their windows throughout the United Kingdom in support of the National Health Service, he created his own version titled “Butterfly Rainbow.” Filling the color bands with his signature butterfly wings, Hirst has made the poster available to everyone on his website.

Bringing art into the public space is another way artists share and connect when museums and galleries are closed. The skyline of Vancouver, BC is the ‘canvas’ for a large word sculpture by Marin Creed. The phrase “EVERYTHING IS GOING TO BE ALRIGHT” is emblazed in neon across the façade of the Wing Sang Building at the Rennie Collection; at seventy-five feet wide it is viewable from all over the city.  While a reassuring expression, it also reminds us that we only hear it when there is something worrisome. But as Creed himself explains: “I work to feel better. I produce things to help me to live ... Living and working is a matter of coming to terms with, to face up to, what comes out of you."1

Over the coming weeks we will offer other inspiring stories of how artists have harnessed their creativity in response to crisis. Their work offers us a lens through which to consider our own responses to our current experience.  Above all, it reminds us that the “thing with feathers” remains strong in all of us.

 

Read the next installment in this art series, Artists in Isolation

 

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1 Martin Creed, Tom Eccles, Massimiliano Gioni and others, Martin Creed Works, London 2010, p.989.